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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

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measures. They are in great triumph; but till it is clear what part his Prussian Uprightness1 is acting, other people take the liberty to be still in suspense. So they are about all our domestic matters too. It is a general stare ! the alteration that must soon happen in the Treasury 2 will put some end to the uncertainties of winter. Mr. Pelham is universally named to the head of it; but Messrs. Prince :i, Carteret, Pulteney, and Companies must be a little considered how they will like it: the latter the least.
You will wonder, perhaps be peevish, when I protest I have not another paragraph by me in the world. I want even common conversation; for I cannot persist, like the Eoyal Family, in asking people the same questions, 'Do you love walking?' 'Do you love music?' ' Was you at the Opera ?' ' When do you go into the country ?' I have nothing else to say : nothing happens ; scarce the common episodes of a newspaper, of a man falling off a ladder and breaking his leg ; or of a countryman cheated of his leather pouch, with fifty shillings in it. We are in such a state of sameness, that I shall begin to wonder at the change of seasons, and talk of the spring as a strange accident. Lord Tyrawley, who has been fifteen years in Portugal, is of my opinion ; he says he finds nothing but a fog, whisk, and the House of Commons.
In this lamentable state, when I know not what to write even to you, what can I do about my serene Princess G-rifoni ? Alas ! I owe her two letters, and where to find a beau sentiment, I cannot tell! I believe I may have some by me in an old chest of drawers, with some exploded red-heel shoes and full-bottom wigs ; but they would come out so yellow and moth-eaten ! Do vow to her, in every superlative degree in the language, that my eyes have been so
LETTER 106.—i The King.                 peoted daily, hut he lived until July.
2 Lord Wilmington's death was ex-        * The Prince of Wales.